Gardening Australia episode 29 2023

Gardening Australia episode 29 2023

Gardening Australia episode 29 2023 – Embarking on an inspirational quest toward environmental restoration, Jane wholeheartedly joins forces with a local movement steadfastly committed to breathing new life into landscapes desecrated by relentless storms. This initiative, fervent in its pursuit, seeks not only to heal the scars left by nature’s fury but also to forge a sustainable path forward for regions under threat, a cause to which Jane devotes herself with characteristic zeal and compassion.


 

 



In contrast, Costa finds himself enraptured by the enduring allure and profound legacy of a garden that proudly wears its heritage status. He delves deeply into its rich tapestry of history, exploring the timeless elegance and continual evolution that have seen this hallowed ground withstand the tests of time. It’s a living testament to the cultural richness and historical continuities that such gardens represent, compelling Costa to explore every hidden pathway and untold story nestled within its verdant confines.

 

 

Meanwhile, Tammy embodies artistic innovation in horticulture. She meticulously curates a visually stunning basket, a cornucopia of various bromeliads that captivate the eye and ignite the imagination. Her selection is not random but a careful orchestration of color, texture, and form, showcasing her exceptional flair and deep understanding of these exotic plants’ unique demands and aesthetic potential.

 

 

In an adventurous spirit of discovery, Jerry plunges into the secret universe beneath our feet, spotlighting the often-overlooked inhabitants of compost. In his exploration, he unveils the monumental significance of these microscopic organisms, the silent heroes of decomposition that are fundamental pillars in the health and vitality of our garden ecosystems. His revelations lay bare a fascinating, hidden symbiosis, stressing the delicate balance and profound interconnectedness of all life forms.

Complementing these explorations, we are privy to an intimate portrait of a devoted home gardener. This individual, a paragon of dedication and passion, has garnered the admiration of culinary masters through an unmatched prowess in cultivating the finest produce. The gardener’s expertise and tireless devotion highlight the profound impact that even a single individual can have, inspiring a ripple effect that elevates the culinary arts and redefines the boundaries of quality and taste.

 

Gardening Australia episode 29 2023

 

 

Joining Forces with a Steadfast Local Movement

Embarking on an inspirational quest toward environmental restoration, Jane wholeheartedly joins forces with a local movement steadfastly committed to breathing new life into landscapes desecrated by relentless storms. This initiative, fervent in its pursuit, seeks not only to heal the scars left by nature’s fury but also to forge a sustainable path forward for regions under threat, a cause to which Jane devotes herself with characteristic zeal and compassion.

In 2021, one of the worst storms in Victoria’s history struck the beautiful Yarra Ranges east of Melbourne. Over an entire night, residents of Kalorama were subjected to the terrifying sounds of wind, rain and falling trees, many up to 50m high. Fortunately, no-one was killed but houses were crushed, gardens destroyed, and lives changed forever.

“We had something like 300 mil of rain. We had all those huge gum trees that you can see around here that were waterlogged, so with 100-kay-plus winds, we had tall trees falling everywhere. The damage was extraordinary,” describes one resident. Around 200 families and 1,000 people were affected.

One resident, Kerry Mason, experienced the full force of nature on that night. “You could just hear trees crashing and could hear them in the distance and I think it started probably about 5 o’clock but it was just getting more and more intense,” she recalls. The main damage to her home was caused by a mountain grey gum that fell and hit the roof. Understandably, it was a devastating event.

Luckily for Kerry, a council initiative called Healing in Our Gardens was quickly set up. “Well, that’s been amazing because just the support really does help take some of that stress away,” she explains gratefully. The program has provided practical assistance like clearing paths and removing invasive ivy, helping storm-affected residents regain a sense of home and familiarity.

Around 160 families have signed up for support and volunteer “garden bees” meet regularly to work in residents’ gardens. It’s a wonderful community initiative that brings people together through gardening. As one resident describes, “Together we can all achieve far more in one garden than we will individually, of course.” For many, it has also been therapeutic. As Kerry shares, seeing damaged plants recover gave her positivity that she could recover too.

The residents volunteering understand the importance of their gardens on a deeper level. Gardening has helped them emotionally process the dramatic storm event. As Kerry articulates, “At times over the last couple of years, it was like, “Oh.” Got a bit low at times. But then things like this happen and, you know, you can really sort of see the possibilities.” The garden community has empowered residents on the path to recovery.

 

Exploring a Garden’s Rich Historical Legacy

In contrast, Costa finds himself enraptured by the enduring allure and profound legacy of a garden that proudly wears its heritage status. He delves deeply into its rich tapestry of history, exploring the timeless elegance and continual evolution that have seen this hallowed ground withstand the tests of time. It’s a living testament to the cultural richness and historical continuities that such gardens represent, compelling Costa to explore every hidden pathway and untold story nestled within its verdant confines.

The garden Costa visits is Everglades House & Gardens, spanning over five hectares on Gundungurra land in the World Heritage listed Blue Mountains. Currently owned and cared for by the National Trust (NSW), it’s a breathtaking garden from a bygone era.

Everglades was designed in the 1930s by renowned landscape designer Paul Sorenson for its former owner, Belgian entrepreneur Henri Van de Velde. Sorenson was given considerable creative license, although he would consult with Van de Velde on key aspects. He even incorporated a whimsical artwork depicting Van de Velde’s beloved dogs.

Everglades is filled with elegant terraces, magnificent stone walls and tranquil water features. One standout is a 30-metre wall with meticulously placed curved stones creating the illusion of drainage pipes. Costa muses, “It looks like they’re actually pieces of pipe. It does – I think he went to a lot of thought in doing this part of the wall just to create these little domes for planting and little amphitheatres of stone.”

Another highlight is a large urn placed before an ancient wych elm tree – one of the early original plantings. The urn marks a focal point in Sorenson’s design, drawing the eye down through this cool-climate garden. Since the 1930s, generations of gardeners have cared for Everglades, following Sorenson’s vision. As Costa discovers, it is a living piece of history.

 

Artistic Innovation Takes Flight in a Visual Masterpiece

Meanwhile, Tammy embodies artistic innovation in horticulture. She meticulously curates a visually stunning basket, a cornucopia of various bromeliads that captivate the eye and ignite the imagination. Her selection is not random but a careful orchestration of color, texture, and form, showcasing her exceptional flair and deep understanding of these exotic plants’ unique demands and aesthetic potential.

Tammy visits an incredible private collection of over 3,000 bromeliads. Truly a “bevy of bromeliads,” it inspires her to showcase these amazing plants and their intriguing features. Bromeliads originate from tropical areas of the Americas and are an astounding evolutionary success story, adapting to diverse habitats from deserts to rainforests. They range from sturdy, spiky pineapples to delicate air plants like Spanish moss.

Their amazing diversity inspires Tammy’s basket design. She chooses a range of bromeliads in different sizes, forms and colors to create a living work of art. There is a tall, yellow-flowering vriesea; a neat, burgundy-spotted neoregelia; and a sculptural, purple-spiked aechmea. Each plant contributes unique beauty, showcasing Tammy’s flair for color and form.

Tammy lines her basket with coconut fiber for excellent drainage, crucial for bromeliads. She then fills it halfway with specialized orchid planting mix before strategically placing her plants for maximum impact. The vriesea’s height makes it ideal for the back, while the aechmea’s bold texture is perfectly positioned at the front. Finally, she backfills with more mix, providing stability. The end result is a stunning basket alive with color, form and texture – a true horticultural masterpiece.

 

Uncovering Compost’s Hidden Heroes

In an adventurous spirit of discovery, Jerry plunges into the secret universe beneath our feet, spotlighting the often-overlooked inhabitants of compost. In his exploration, he unveils the monumental significance of these microscopic organisms, the silent heroes of decomposition that are fundamental pillars in the health and vitality of our garden ecosystems. His revelations lay bare a fascinating, hidden symbiosis, stressing the delicate balance and profound interconnectedness of all life forms.

Jerry emphasizes that a good compost heap is “garden magic”, transforming waste into invaluable gardening material. But what makes this transformation possible? Jerry peeks inside his bin to uncover the creatures that labor day and night to produce this black gold.

First are the vinegar flies and compost worms, both decomposing organic matter into rich compost. Worms are especially important, generating nutrient-packed castings, so Jerry introduces them into new compost heaps. Woodlice are also valuable residents. Related to crabs and lobsters, they accelerate composting by digesting plant remnants. Jerry discovers them busily nibbling away, performing their crucial role out of sight.

Soldier flies are another common but inconspicuous inhabitant. Their larvae voraciously consume kitchen scraps, speeding decomposition. At night, the larvae’s bristles rustle against the bin as they race to freshly added food. Though rarely noticed, they are compost workhorses, demolishing vast amounts of waste.

Importantly, there are also legions of microscopic organisms – bacteria, fungi, amoebae and more. Too small to see, these single-celled life forms swarm ceaselessly over organic particles, unlocking nutrients in a thriving hidden ecosystem. Truly, as Jerry reveals, compost heaps depend on the monumental efforts of microscopic workers.

 

Cultivating Excellence to Elevate the Culinary Arts

Complementing these explorations, we are privy to an intimate portrait of a devoted home gardener. This individual, a paragon of dedication and passion, has garnered the admiration of culinary masters through an unmatched prowess in cultivating the finest produce. The gardener’s expertise and tireless devotion highlight the profound impact that even a single individual can have, inspiring a ripple effect that elevates the culinary arts and redefines the boundaries of quality and taste.

The home gardener is Sulyn Lam, who grows fresh produce in South Hobart. With Chinese and Italian heritage, she was raised valuing delicious, homegrown food. This inspired her botanical journey, remembering her Italian family grew vegetables and her Chinese father experienced famine, driving his passion for self-sufficiency.

Despite having no garden originally, Sulyn tirelessly nurtured the soil. Supportive husband Rob documented her progress as the plot flourished into a bountiful acre. For over 30 years, they have gardened together. Now nearing 70, Sulyn grows heirloom vegetables and herbs prized by chefs for intense flavours. She welcomes volunteers who find therapy in the rhythms of gardening.

Sulyn’s fresh produce and personal relationships are cherished by chefs. As one describes, her passion and knowledge make you see all produce differently. Her hyper-local, seasonal offerings canned just streets away are a unique privilege. For Sulyn too, the concrete transformation from seed to meal is deeply meaningful. She sees echoes of her parents’ legacy in this visceral, generative act.

Through dedication to her craft, Sulyn has created a micro-epoch in Tasmania’s culinary scene. Her zeal for intense flavours redefines expectations, compelling chefs to innovative heights. A touching devotion to her parents’ values seeds a profound impact, proving that a single gardener’s passion can inspire waves of creativity and progress.

 

Regenerating Neglected Landscapes

Jane wholeheartedly joins forces with a local movement steadfastly committed to breathing new life into landscapes desecrated by relentless storms. This initiative seeks not only to heal the scars left by nature’s fury but also to forge a sustainable path forward for regions under threat.

The group Jane works with is from the Yarra Ranges, where a devastating storm struck in 2021. It wreaked havoc, destroying homes and gardens. One resident describes, “We had something like 300 mil of rain. We had all those huge gum trees that were waterlogged, so with 100-kay-plus winds, we had tall trees falling everywhere.”

For resident Kerry Mason, a huge gum tree crashed into her home. She recalls, “You could just hear trees crashing and could hear them in the distance.” It was deeply traumatic and her garden was also badly damaged. Luckily, the council initiative Healing in Our Gardens provided practical and emotional support.

Healing in Our Gardens organizes volunteer “garden bees” who regularly work together in residents’ gardens. As one volunteer shares, “Together we can all achieve far more in one garden than we will individually, of course.” It has been an empowering community initiative promoting recovery.

One resident explains how gardening has helped her process the dramatic storm event. She says, “At times over the last couple of years, it was like, ‘Oh.’ Got a bit low at times. But then things like this happen and you can really sort of see the possibilities.” For many, it has contributed to emotional healing.

 

Uncovering a Garden’s Hidden History

Costa delves deeply into the rich legacy of Everglades, a heritage garden that proudly wears its history. Designed in the 1930s by Paul Sorenson, it spans 5 hectares in the Blue Mountains. Sorenson was commissioned by Belgian owner Henri Van de Velde to design this breathtaking “weekender” estate.

Sorenson incorporated charming details honoring Van de Velde’s personality, like a whimsical artwork depicting his beloved dogs. He was given creative license, although he consulted Van de Velde on aspects like key focal points. Costa discovers Sorenson’s vision remains alive through the work of generations of gardeners.

Everglades’ terraces, stone walls and tranquil ponds create an atmosphere of timeless elegance. One highlight is a domed 30-metre wall with meticulously placed curved stones resembling pipes. Costa observes, “It does – I think he went to a lot of thought in doing this part of the wall just to create these little domes for planting and little amphitheatres of stone.”

Another feature is a large urn placed before an ancient elm tree, one of the early plantings. The urn marks a focal point in Sorenson’s design, drawing the eye down through this cool-climate garden. Costa finds traces of Sorenson’s artistry around every corner, revealing Everglades’ hidden history.

 

Plant Selection as an Art Form

Tammy meticulously curates a visually stunning basket, a cornucopia of bromeliads that showcase her exceptional flair. Her selection is a careful orchestration of color, texture, and form that ignites the imagination. She visits a jaw-dropping private collection of over 3000 bromeliads, seeking to highlight their diversity.

Bromeliads originate from the Americas and have adapted to varied conditions from deserts to rainforests. Their forms range from sturdy, spiky pineapples to delicate air plants like Spanish moss. Tammy hand-picks contrasting bromeliads to showcase their aesthetic potential.

She chooses a tall, yellow vriesea; a neat burgundy neoregelia with spotted leaves; and a sculptural, spiky purple aechmea. Meticulously placing each plant in her coconut fiber-lined basket, she crafts a living work of art. The vriesea’s height makes it perfect for the back, while the aechmea creates a bold textural feature up front.

Tammy emphasizes bromeliads’ intriguing features like water-collecting central cups and pups which allow easy propagation. Her basket beautifully highlights bromeliads’ amazing diversity. With endless shapes, colors and sizes, they offer captivating options for imaginative plant arrangements. Tammy proves plant selection can be an art form.

 

The Monumental Efforts of Microscopic Heroes

Jerry shines a light on the overlooked creatures in compost who make “garden magic” possible. Their collective efforts unlocking nutrients from waste are fundamental pillars underpinning garden health. Jerry reveals a fascinating hidden symbiosis stressing the interconnectedness of all life forms.

First are the visible creatures – worms, woodlice, soldier flies. Worms generate nutrient-rich castings while woodlice accelerate decomposition by digesting plant matter. Soldier fly larvae voraciously consume scraps, quickly demolishing waste. All perform their crucial roles out of sight.

But Jerry emphasizes the legions of microscopic organisms at work. Bacteria, fungi, amoebae and more swarm tirelessly over organic particles, breaking them down. Though individually invisible, collectively their monumental efforts transform waste into mature, crumbly, odourless compost brimming with life. This complex ecosystem of micro and macroscopic creatures keeps the compost factory ticking.

Jerry concludes that compost depends on the collective labour of microscopic organisms. Their hidden contributions are easy to overlook, but he stresses their significance. These tiny heroes make possible the magical process of decomposition that in turn nourishes our gardens. Awe-inspiring symbioses like this prove that all elements, no matter how small, play irreplaceable roles in nature’s grand design.

 

One Gardener’s Ripple Effect on a Community

We are privy to an intimate portrait of home gardener Sulyn Lam, whose passion and dedication have elevated the culinary arts. Through cultivating excellent produce, she inspires creativity and progress, proving one individual can profoundly impact a community.

With Chinese and Italian heritage, Sulyn was raised valuing fresh, home-grown food. Despite having no garden initially, she nurtured the soil into a thriving acre-sized plot brimming with heirloom herbs and vegetables. For over 30 years she has gardened alongside supportive husband Rob who documents her progress.

Now nearing 70, Sulyn grows prized produce for local chefs who cherish her intense flavors and hands-on approach. As one chef describes, her passion makes you see all produce differently. Her hyper-local offerings create unique opportunities for chefs to innovate.

For Sulyn, the physical process of growing food echoes her parents’ values. She sees the visceral act of generating sustenance from the earth as deeply meaningful. Through tireless dedication to her craft, Sulyn has created a new standard of quality and taste. She proves that one gardener’s devotion can propel ripples of creativity, progress and community connectedness.

 

Conclusion

The stories explored in this article reveal the tremendous diversity within gardening – from environmental restoration to honouring personal heritage. But common threads bind these tales, like how gardens represent interconnectivity. The Yarra Ranges gardeners foster community resilience, while compost relies on synergies between micro and macroscopic life. Costa uncovers hidden stories linking past and present at Everglades, and Sulyn’s work elevates networks of chefs, farmers and foodies. Across the board, gardens emerge as ecosystems reflecting the interdependence underpinning our world.

These stories also showcase gardens’ role in emotional healing. For storm victims, gardening salves psychological wounds, becoming integral to the recovery process. The deep solace and hope Costa discovers wandering Everglades’ historic grounds echoes this. Gardens offer spaces for reflection and growth, enriching human experience. Whether restoring neglected land or nurturing one’s connection to ancestry, these tales prove gardens can anchor us through life’s turbulent seasons.

Most of all, these stories reveal the wondrous diversity enclosed within each garden. As Tammy’s bromeliad basket demonstrates, horticultural possibility is limited only by imagination. Similarly, Sulyn’s plot presents chefs with a kaleidoscope of flavours. Gardens provide a creative canvas, spurring innovation. They cultivate the inventiveness flourishing at science’s cutting edge and the vision lighting the arts. Indeed, more than growing plants, gardens grow human potential – the greatest harvest of all.

 

Frequently Asked Questions – Gardening Australia episode 29 2023

 

How did Healing in Our Gardens assist Yarra Ranges residents?

The program organized volunteer “garden bees” to help clear debris and remove invasive plants. Working collectively provided emotional support and boosted community spirit.

What aspects of the original 1930s garden remain at Everglades?

Generations of gardeners have maintained signature features like Sorenson’s elegant terraces, stone walls and tranquil ponds. Costa still discovers traces of Sorenson’s unique vision.

Why does Tammy advocate growing bromeliads?

Tammy highlights bromeliads’ astonishing diversity in shape, color and habitat. Their versatility makes them excellent for imaginative plant arrangements and displays.

What is the importance of microscopic organisms in compost?

Microscopic bacteria, fungi and more perform the vital behind-the-scenes work of breaking down organic waste particles and unlocking nutrients in compost.

How did Sulyn Lam impact her local food community?

Through cultivating excellent heirloom produce, Sulyn demonstrated one gardener’s passion and skill can elevate a region’s culinary scene, inspiring chefs to new creative heights

What damage did the storm cause in the Yarra Ranges?

The 2021 storm destroyed houses, severely damaged gardens, and felled enormous trees up to 50 metres tall in the Yarra Ranges. Around 200 families and 1000 people were impacted.

How did Healing in Our Gardens help the storm victims?

Healing in Our Gardens provided practical assistance clearing debris and removing invasive plants from residents’ gardens. It also fostered a supportive community, with volunteer “garden bees” regularly working together in people’s gardens.

What history does Everglades House & Gardens hold?

Everglades is a heritage-listed Blue Mountains garden, designed in the 1930s by Paul Sorenson for owner Henri Van de Velde. It features terraces, stone walls, and tranquil water features that Costa explores.

Why does Tammy advocate growing bromeliads?

Tammy is inspired by bromeliads’ astonishing diversity, adapting to varied habitats from deserts to rainforests. She highlights their range of shapes, colors and sizes for their aesthetic potential in intricate plant arrangements.

What creatures does Jerry uncover in his compost?

Jerry spotlights often overlooked compost inhabitants like worms, woodlice, soldier flies, and microscopic organisms. Their collective efforts performing decomposition make compost creation possible.

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