James Martin’s Food Map of Britain episode 1

James Martin's Food Map of Britain episode 1

James Martin’s Food Map of Britain episode 1: Chef James Martin takes to the skies to explore how the beautiful and unique landscape of the British Isles. Britain, in all its glory, serves not only as our cherished homeland, but also as a veritable pantry, brimming with the promise of countless gastronomic delights. Renowned Chef James Martin embarks on a captivating journey, soaring through the azure skies, immersing himself in an exploration of how the British Isles’ awe-inspiring landscape nurtures distinctively flavourful regional produce.


 

 



From the craggy cliffs of Cornwall to the heather-filled highlands of Scotland, every facet of this emerald isle contributes to a unique assortment of ingredients that paint a rich tapestry of taste. A prominent highlight of his voyage is the exploration of the sun-kissed southeast, a verdant paradise known for its bountiful harvest.

 

 

Among the regional gems he uncovers are Kent’s sweet, succulent cherries, little orbs of delight that are a testament to the fertile soils and the gentle caress of the region’s climate. His quest also leads him to uncover why his most beloved flat fish finds the perfect sanctuary in the balmy shallow waters skirting the southern coastline. He revels in the exceptional conditions that allow this delicacy to not only survive but also thrive.

Immersed in his discovery journey, Chef Martin dons his culinary hat to whip up some truly delectable creations. He honours the essence of Hastings with an exquisite Dover sole recipe, prepared with passion and reverence for the classic dish. His culinary exploits culminate in the crafting of a deeply decadent Kentish cherry trifle, a dessert so indulgent, it pays the perfect homage to the region’s exceptional produce. By exploring these culinary treasures that our beloved Britain offers, Chef Martin invites us to appreciate the influence of landscape and climate on our plates, celebrating the diversity and exceptional flavour of regional ingredients.

 

James Martin’s Food Map of Britain episode 1

 

Cherry trifle

Cherry trifle
Cherry trifle

 

Defying the conventional belief that trifles are a dessert reserved solely for the Christmas season, James Martin’s take on this classic dessert will completely transform your perspective. His cherry-topped version breaks the holiday mold, proving that this beloved sweet treat can be just as fitting, if not more so, for a summer gathering.

Inspired by the abundant summer bounty, James takes the humble trifle and elevates it with a burst of seasonal freshness – ripe, luscious cherries. Their vibrant hue and the naturally sweet and tart flavor serve as a delightful counterpoint to the creamy layers of the trifle, bringing a refreshing twist to every spoonful.

This cherry-topped trifle is more than just a dessert; it’s a celebration of summer in a dish. Each layer mirrors the joy and warmth of sunny days and al fresco meals. It’s an ideal centerpiece for a summer gathering, offering a dessert that’s both visually appealing and delectably satisfying. So as you plan your next summer soiree, remember that a trifle needn’t be confined to the festive season. James Martin’s cherry-topped trifle, with its summer-infused flair, is ready to be the showstopper of your party.

Method:

  • Make a sugar syrup by heating the caster sugar with 100ml/3½fl oz water until the sugar has completely dissolved. Set aside to cool slightly.
  • Put the cherries in a large pan with 50ml/2fl oz of the sugar syrup and half the cherry brandy. Cook for 5-10 minutes, then set aside to cool.
  • Whisk together half the cream and all the custard.
  • Soak the cake slices in the remaining brandy and 50ml/2fl oz sugar syrup.
  • In a large serving bowl, create the layers. First add the cherries, then the soaked cake and top with the cream and custard mixture.
  • Put the remaining whipped cream in a piping bag and pipe swirls onto the top of the trifle. Cover with the grated chocolate.
  • To decorate, melt the sugar into a non-stick pan set over a medium heat. Keep heating until a dark-brown caramel forms (CAUTION: Do not leave unattended), then immediately dunk the pan in cold water to prevent the caramel burning.
  • Carefully dip the cherries into the caramel and place on a silicone mat or non-stick baking parchment to cool completely. When cool decorate the trifle with them.

Chef James Martin

James Martin’s impact on the culinary world extends beyond his initial career as a chef. He has used his talents to educate and entertain through television presenting, authoring cookbooks, and teaching at his cookery school. Furthermore, his pivot from cookery to include journalism and television appearances reflects his versatility. Despite facing controversies and setbacks, such as the closure of some of his restaurants, Martin has continually reinvented himself, contributing significantly to British culinary arts and television. His recognition and awards validate his efforts, making him a key figure in the culinary world.

  • James Martin, born 30 June 1972, is a renowned British chef and television presenter.
  • He has made significant contributions to British television with his involvement in popular culinary shows with both the BBC and ITV.
  • Martin was the presenter of the widely popular BBC cookery series, Saturday Kitchen from 2006 until 2016. After leaving BBC, he moved on to ITV.
  • On ITV, Martin presented James Martin’s French Adventure (2017), Saturday Morning with James Martin (2017–present), and James Martin’s American Adventure (2018).
  • His early culinary interests were piqued by his family who were farmers, and he often helped his mother in the kitchen.
  • Martin received culinary training at Hostellerie De Plaisance, Saint-Émilion, France, and then spent two years as a Pastry Chef at Chewton Glen Hotel in the South of England.
  • He made his television debut in 1996, appearing in various cooking-related programs.
  • Martin had a stint as a journalist, writing a motoring column for UK newspaper The Mail on Sunday until 2013.
  • He has opened several restaurants, including The Leeds Kitchen (closed in 2013), a restaurant inside The Talbot Hotel (left in 2015), and James Martin Manchester.
  • In 2021, Martin collaborated with potato company Albert Bartlett for the relaunch of the SpudULike by James Martin chain of restaurants.
  • Martin also teaches at The Kitchen – Cookery School at Chewton Glen, a cookery school and dining restaurant.
  • He introduced a range of premium French wines in September 2021.
  • Martin has gained a private pilot license and later on qualified as a helicopter pilot. He’s also a car and racing enthusiast.
  • He has been in a relationship with Louise Davies, a TV producer, since 2011.
  • Martin has received several awards and honours for his contribution to culinary arts and television, including ‘TV Personality of the Year’ at the Fortnum & Mason Awards in 2015 and 2021.
  • In addition to his television appearances, Martin has authored multiple cookbooks, including “James Martin’s Great British Adventure: A celebration of Great British food,” which won ‘Best Cookbook’ at the Great British Food Awards in 2021.

James Martin’s impact on the culinary world extends beyond his initial career as a chef. He has used his talents to educate and entertain through television presenting, authoring cookbooks, and teaching at his cookery school. Furthermore, his pivot from cookery to include journalism and television appearances reflects his versatility. Despite facing controversies and setbacks, such as the closure of some of his restaurants, Martin has continually reinvented himself, contributing significantly to British culinary arts and television. His recognition and awards validate his efforts, making him a key figure in the culinary world.

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