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A Park for All Seasons from Above episode 6 - North of Superior

A Park for All Seasons from Above episode 6 – North of Superior

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A Park for All Seasons from Above episode 6 – North of Superior: get a bird’s-eye view of the world’s most stunning National and Provincial Parks of Canada by soaring high above arctic tundra, through towering mountain ranges, and pristine forests. From up in the air see nature’s beauty from a whole new perspective.



 

 

A Park for All Seasons from Above episode 6 – North of Superior

 

Sleeping Giant Provincial Park, established in 1944 as Sibley Provincial Park and renamed in 1988, is a 244-square-kilometre (94 sq mi) park located on the Sibley Peninsula in Northwestern Ontario, east of Thunder Bay. The nearest communities are Pass Lake, in the township of Sibley, located at the northern entrance to the park, and Dorion, located 35 kilometres (22 mi) NW, in the township of Shuniah. The seasonal community of Silver Islet is located on the southern tip of the peninsula. The primary feature of the park is the Sleeping Giant, which is most visible from the city of Thunder Bay.

 

Sleeping Giant Provincial Park

 

The park occupies most of the lower portion of the peninsula excluding the area around the seasonal community of Silver Islet, and a portion of Thunder Cape which is designated as the Thunder Cape Bird Observatory. The eastern portion of the park is lowlands, while the western half is terrain composed of cliffs, valleys, and the mesa–cuestas which make up the Sleeping Giant formation. At its eastern edge, it will touch the future Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area.

The Sibley Peninsula is 52 kilometres long and 10 kilometres wide. It projects into Lake Superior from the north shore, separating Thunder Bay to the west and Black Bay to the east. The peninsula can be separated into two physiographic areas—highlands and lowlands. The highlands dominate the western half of the peninsula, and rise to 380 metres above the surface of Lake Superior. The lowlands of the eastern portion of the peninsula rise to only 75 metres (246 ft), over an area 3 to 6 kilometres wide. With the exception of diabase dikes and the large diabase sill that forms the upper portion of the Sleeping Giant, the peninsula is underlain by sedimentary rocks, which strike northeast and slope towards the southwest, forming a cuesta.

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A Park for All Seasons from Above episode 6 - North of Superior
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A Park for All Seasons from Above episode 6 - North of Superior: get a bird’s-eye view of the world’s most stunning National and Provincial Parks of Canada

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