The A to Z of TV Gardening – Letters  X, Y and Z
The A to Z of TV Gardening - Letters X, Y and Z

The A to Z of TV Gardening – Letters X, Y and Z

The A to Z of TV Gardening – Letters X, Y and Z: Carol Kirkwood takes an alphabetical journey through the world of gardening, getting inspiration and advice from some of the BBC’s most popular garden presenters and gardening programmes.



 


 

In this episode, she is exploring subjects that all begin with the letters  X, Y and Z: Yucca, Xeriscaping, Zoo

 

The A to Z of TV Gardening – Letters X, Y and Z

 

Yucca

Yucca is a genus of perennial shrubs and trees in the family Asparagaceae, subfamily Agavoideae. Its 40–50 species are notable for their rosettes of evergreen, tough, sword-shaped leaves and large terminal panicles of white or whitish flowers. They are native to the hot and dry (arid) parts of the Americas and the Caribbean.

Early reports of the species were confused with the cassava (Manihot esculenta). Consequently, Linnaeus mistakenly derived the generic name from the Taíno word for the latter, yuca (spelled with a single “c”). It is commonly found growing in rural graveyards and when in bloom the cluster of (usually pale) flowers on a thin stalk appear as floating apparitions.

The natural distribution range of the genus Yucca (49 species and 24 subspecies) covers a vast area of the Americas. The genus is represented throughout Mexico and extends into Guatemala (Yucca guatemalensis). It also extends to the north through Baja California in the west, northwards into the southwestern United States, through the drier central states as far north as southern Alberta in Canada (Yucca glauca ssp. albertana).

Yucca is also native to some of the Caribbean Islands, northward to the coastal lowlands and dry beach scrub of the coastal areas of the southeastern United States, along the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic States from coastal Texas to Maryland.

Xeriscaping

Xeriscaping is the process of landscaping or gardening that reduces or eliminates the need for supplemental water from irrigation. It is promoted in regions that do not have accessible, plentiful, or reliable supplies of fresh water and is gaining acceptance in other regions as access to irrigation water is becoming limited. Xeriscaping may be an alternative to various types of traditional gardening.

In some areas, terms as water-conserving landscapes, drought-tolerant landscaping, and smart scaping are used instead. Plants whose natural requirements are appropriate to the local climate are emphasized and care is taken to avoid losing water to evaporation and run-off. The specific plants used in xeriscaping depend upon the climate. Xeriscaping is different from natural landscaping, because the emphasis in xeriscaping is on selection of plants for water conservation, not necessarily selecting native plants.

Public perception of xeriscaping has frequently been negative as many assume that these types of landscapes are ugly expanses of cactus and gravel. However, studies have shown that education in water conservation practices in the landscape can greatly improve the public’s perception of xeriscaping.

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The A to Z of TV Gardening - Letters  X, Y and Z
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The A to Z of TV Gardening - Letters X, Y and Z
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The A to Z of TV Gardening - Letters X, Y and Z: Carol Kirkwood takes an alphabetical journey through the world of gardening, getting inspiration and advice

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