You are currently viewing Beechgrove Gardens in Winter 2022 episode 4
Beechgrove Gardens in Winter 2022 episode 4

Beechgrove Gardens in Winter 2022 episode 4

Beechgrove Gardens in Winter 2022 episode 4: George Anderson and Calum Clunie round off the series of autumn and winter gardening advice from Beechgrove. They answer viewers’ questions on topics covering the gardening jobs that need to get done between now and the spring, and there is a report from father and daughter Erin and Joe Armstrong from their plot in East Lothian. Calum is back on his own plot at Beechgrove this week, planting bare root roses and moving a rhubarb crown, he also checks on the tatties he planted that should be ready for Christmas dinner. There’s also a report from another gorgeous garden that the show featured during the summer to find out what they are up to at this time of year.



 

 

 

Celebrating the great Scottish garden. Tips and advice to get the most out of your garden, with inspirational ideas from Scotland’s most beautiful green spaces. The Beechgrove Garden has been on air since 1978 and remains a firm favourite with audiences in Scotland. It consistently outperforms what is being screened by BBC Network in the same slot. At the heart of the series is a 2.5 acre home garden, situated on a cold, inhospitable slope west of Aberdeen, deliberately chosen to reflect Scotland’s harsher climate.

Horticultural advice in gardening magazines and on UK network gardening programmes is rarely suitable for most of the UK outside the South East of England. Beechgrove shares with its viewers the weekly challenge to work with the Scottish conditions to produce maximum yield of as many varieties as possible of fruit, flowers and vegetables.

 

Beechgrove Gardens in Winter 2022 episode 4

 

Planting bare root roses

Roses can be expensive plants, but they last for many, many years and are easy to establish if you follow a few simple steps on planting and aftercare. Planting bare-root roses during the dormant season is a great way to get ahead for the growing season and save money, too.

Bare root roses are available to buy in autumn and winter and are more economical than planting pot-grown roses, and there’s a much wider variety of bare rooted roses to choose from than if buying pot-grown plants. Unlike potted plants, a bare-root rose has naked roots with no soil. You plant them when dormant and, as soon as temperatures increase again in spring, they start into growth quickly and strongly.

Dig out a hole in the soil to the depth of a garden spade and the same width. Put the soil to one side of the hole. Fork the base of the hole and add half a handful of granular fertiliser, such as pelleted chicken manure. Lightly firm the base of the hole with your foot. Set the bare-root rose in position and use a bamboo cane placed across the top of the hole to judge the final soil level around the plant. Aim to set the base of the stems just slightly below this level.

Add a spadeful of compost to the soil dug out of the hole and mix it together. Use this to fill in around the roots of the rose, firming in layers with the heel of your foot. When the hole is full, add a mulch of well-rotted compost to the surface of the soil to help conserve moisture. Water the rose well.

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Beechgrove Gardens in Winter 2022 episode 4
Title
Beechgrove Gardens in Winter 2022 episode 4
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Beechgrove Gardens in Winter 2022 episode 4: George Anderson and Calum Clunie round off the series of autumn and winter gardening advice from Beechgrove.

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