You are currently viewing Hairy Bikers’ Best of British episode 2 – Bread
Hairy Bikers' Best of British episode 2

Hairy Bikers’ Best of British episode 2 – Bread

Hairy Bikers’ Best of British episode 2 – Bread: In this episode, they explore how Britain’s love affair with bread has evolved over centuries. With their unique banter and camaraderie, the hairy duo try their hand at bagel making. They also create their own version of the summer pudding and make a delicious soup and roll combo.



 

 

Si and Dave take a culinary journey through time to celebrate British food.

 

Hairy Bikers’ Best of British episode 2 – Bread

 

Creamy parsnip and apple soup

Creamy parsnip and apple soup
Creamy parsnip and apple soup

This delicious parsnip and apple soup perfectly combines tangy cooking apples and the sweetness from parsnips. A wonderfully smooth soup.

Method:

  • Melt the butter and oil in a large saucepan. Gently fry the onions and parsnips for 15 minutes, or until the onions are softened. Add the garlic and apples and cook for a further two minutes, stirring regularly.
  • Pour over the stock and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for about 20 minutes, or until the parsnips are very soft. Remove from the heat and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Blend the mixture in a food processor until smooth.
  • Stir in the milk, adding a little extra if required. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Sage and onion tear and share bread

Sage and onion tear and share bread
Sage and onion tear and share bread

Tear and share these delicious sage and onion bread rolls – a perfect accompaniment to a warming soup.

Method:

  • Heat 150ml/5fl oz water and the milk in a saucepan over a low heat until lukewarm.
  • Sift the flour into a large mixing bowl and stir in the yeast, sugar and salt.
  • Make a well in the centre and stir in the water and milk with a large wooden spoon. Gather into a ball then turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 10 minutes.
  • Place the dough in an oiled bowl and cover loosely with oiled cling film. Leave to rise in a warm place for 45-60 minutes or until doubled in size.
  • Meanwhile, melt the butter and oil in a large non-stick frying pan and fry the onion and garlic over a very low heat for 10 minutes, or until softened.

Method part 2:

  • Scatter the chopped sage over the onions and cook for a further 2-3 minutes. Remove from the heat, season with lots of freshly ground black pepper and set aside to cool.
  • When the dough has doubled in size, tip it back onto a floured surface and flatten with the palms of your hands. Spoon the onion mixture on top and knead for a couple of minutes until evenly incorporated. Sprinkle with a little extra flour if it becomes sticky.
  • Divide the dough into eight and shape into neat balls by pulling the dough from the outside of the ball and pushing into the centre. Turn over with the ends underneath. Place the rolls in a circle on a large baking tray lined with greaseproof paper, making sure the dough balls are touching. Cover loosely with oiled cling film and leave to prove in a warm place for 45 minutes, or until doubled in size.
  • Preheat the oven to 200C/180C (fan)/Gas 6.
  • Brush the top of each roll lightly with milk and place a small sage leaf on top. Brush with more milk and bake in the centre of the oven for 20 minutes, or until risen and golden-brown. Transfer to a wire rack and leave to cool a little before serving.

Autumn pudding – Hairy Bikers’ Best of British episode 2

Autumn pudding
Autumn pudding

This autumnal version of summer pudding is a great way of making the most of Autumnal fruit. Serve with a drizzle of double cream.

 

Method:

  • Place the fruit, sugar and butter into a saucepan and cook on a medium heat for 15 minutes, or until softened. (Don’t stir too often as the fruit will become mushy.)
  • Remove the pan from the heat and pour the contents into a colander set over a large bowl. Leave to stand for 8-10 minutes, stirring once or twice, so as much juice as possible is released by the fruit. You should end up with around 600ml/20fl oz.
  • Pour the fruit juice back into the saucepan, bring to a simmer and cook for 10-15 minutes, or until the volume of the liquid has reduced by half. Remove the pan from the heat and set aside to cool for 20-30 minutes.
  • Lightly oil a 1.5 litre/2 pint pudding basin and line with clingfilm, leaving plenty overhanging the edge. Cut a slice of bread using a round cutter and dip it quickly into the fruit juice. Place in the base of the pudding basin.

Method part 2:

  • Cut the other bread slices in half and dip one at a time into the juice. Arrange in slightly overlapping vertical pieces around the inside of the basin, making sure they are soaked in juice without being soggy.
  • Once all the sides of the basin are lined with bread, pour half of the remaining fruit juice over the drained fruit and stir very lightly until it looks plump and glossy. Spoon the mixture into the pudding basin.
  • Dip the remaining slices of bread in the fruit juice and place over the top of the pudding, trimming the bread where necessary to give a neat finish. Reserve any remaining fruit juice in a small bowl.
  • Place the pudding onto a dinner plate. Cover the top of the pudding with the cling film, place a plate on top (make sure it fits inside the basin) and weigh down with a couple of tins. Chill in the fridge overnight.
  • When ready to serve, remove the weights and plate and open the clingfilm. Place a serving plate on top of the pudding and invert. Remove the basin and peel off the cling film. Brush any gaps where white bread is showing with the reserved fruit juice.

 

Summary
Title
Hairy Bikers' Best of British episode 2
Description

Hairy Bikers' Best of British episode 2: In this episode, they explore how Britain's love affair with bread has evolved over centuries.

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