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Kate Humble: Off the Beaten Track episode 1

Kate Humble: Off the Beaten Track episode 1

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Kate Humble: Off the Beaten Track episode 1: The presenter and her Welsh sheepdog, Teg, travel from the most northerly farm on mainland Wales, just outside Llandudno, across to the sleepy hamlet of Nantmor in Snowdonia. Along the way they experience the comeback of old style shepherding, learn how canine power is saving lives on the mountains and see a forest through the eyes of a pack of huskies. Kate sheds her layers to plunge naked into a freezing lake to experience the landscape in a very different way. And in the largest shiitake farm in the country, she finds out how to trick mushrooms into fruiting.



 

 

Kate Humble and her Welsh sheepdog Teg travel from the tip of North Wales through the remotest parts of Wales to the south coast. Along the way they explore how the landscape shapes the people who live there.

 

Kate Humble: Off the Beaten Track episode 1

 

Katherine Mary Humble is an English television presenter and narrator, mainly working for the BBC, specialising in wildlife and science programmes. Humble served as President of the RSPB from 2009 until 2013. She is an ambassador for the UK walking charity Living Streets.

Wales

Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon (Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate.

Welsh national identity emerged among the Britons after the Roman withdrawal from Britain in the 5th century, and Wales is regarded as one of the modern Celtic nations. Llywelyn ap Gruffudd’s death in 1282 marked the completion of Edward I of England’s conquest of Wales, though Owain Glyndŵr briefly restored independence to Wales in the early 15th century. The whole of Wales was annexed by England and incorporated within the English legal system under the Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542.

Distinctive Welsh politics developed in the 19th century. Welsh Liberalism, exemplified in the early 20th century by David Lloyd George, was displaced by the growth of socialism and the Labour Party. Welsh national feeling grew over the century; a nationalist party, Plaid Cymru was formed in 1925, and the Welsh Language Society in 1962. Established under the Government of Wales Act 1998, the Senedd (the Welsh Parliament, formerly known as the National Assembly for Wales) is responsible for a range of devolved policy matters.

Llandudno – Kate Humble: Off the Beaten Track episode 1

Llandudno is a seaside resort, town and community in Conwy County Borough, Wales, located on the Creuddyn peninsula, which protrudes into the Irish Sea. In the 2011 UK census, the community – which includes Gogarth, Penrhyn Bay, Craigside, Glanwydden, Penrhynside, and Bryn Pydew – had a population of 20,701. The town’s name is derived from its patron saint, Saint Tudno.

Llandudno is the largest seaside resort in Wales, and as early as 1861 was being called ‘the Queen of the Welsh Watering Places’ (a phrase later also used in connection with Tenby and Aberystwyth; the word ‘resort’ came a little later). Historically a part of Caernarfonshire, Llandudno was formerly in the district of Aberconwy within Gwynedd.

Snowdonia

Snowdonia is a mountainous region in northwestern Wales and a national park of 823 square miles (2,130 km2) in area. It was the first to be designated of the three national parks in Wales, in 1951.

Before the boundaries of the national park were designated, “Snowdonia” was generally used to refer to a smaller area, namely the upland area of northern Gwynedd centred on the Snowdon massif, whereas the national park covers an area more than twice that size extending far to the south into Meirionnydd. This is apparent in books published prior to 1951, such as the classic travelogue Wild Wales by George Borrow (1862) and The Mountains of Snowdonia by H. Carr & G. Lister (1925). F. J. North, as editor of the book Snowdonia (1949), states “When the Committee delineated provisional boundaries, they included areas some distance beyond Snowdonia proper.” The traditional Snowdonia thus includes the ranges of Snowdon and its satellites, the Glyderau, the Carneddau, the Moelwynion and the Moel Hebog group. It does not include the hills to the south of Maentwrog. As Eryri (see above), this area has a unique place in Welsh history, tradition and culture.

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Kate Humble: Off the Beaten Track episode 1
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Kate Humble: Off the Beaten Track episode 1
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Kate Humble: Off the Beaten Track episode 1: The presenter and her Welsh sheepdog, Teg, travel from the most northerly farm on mainland Wales